See photos showing the surface of the sun flowing in hot plasma

0
1


Paul Andrew, a retired photography instructor, took a series of images of the sun’s surface from his garden in British Kent, where its surface shows the flow of hot white plasma. 66-year-old Andrew captured images using the Lund 152 telescope, which shows the series of images showing the turbulent surface of the star, which is far away. More than 92 million miles from Earth.

According to British newspaper “Daily Mail”, a series of violent plasma projections and explosions flowing from the surface of the sun were captured with the black background of space.

Sun photos
Sun images with plasma

Andrew says the best time to take sun photos is during the summer, when they are high in the sky.

He added, “I use telescopic whenever possible when the weather is sunny, however, I cannot do much during the winter months as the sun is very low in the sky and the conditions of vision can be very poor,” explaining, “The sun always changes and I never know what I will see.”

Sun Image 2
The image of the sun

And Andrew, after retiring as a lecturer in photography from the University of Kent, wanted to combine his interests in art and astronomy.

“I find it incredible to believe that the pictures currently produced by many hobbyists are much better than those taken by the largest telescopes in the world only a few years ago,” he said.

But he stresses that taking pictures of the sun is fraught with technical difficulties, and depends on a large slice of luck, explaining, “Unlike many astronomical things, the sun always changes and never knows what to expect from day to day.”

The image of the sun
The image of the new sun

And Andrew continued: “When photographing from the UK, there is always a constant battle with bad and turbulent weather conditions called visibility, which degrades the tiniest detail around the sun.

He added: “Most of the time this can be very frustrating, but when you get those short moments of continuous good vision and successfully capture some fine details, all the frustrations and your hard work become worth it.”

And Andrew, after retiring as a lecturer in photography from the University of Kent, wanted to combine his interests in art and astronomy.

“I find it incredible to believe that the pictures currently produced by many hobbyists are much better than those taken by the largest telescopes in the world just a few years ago,” he said.

But he stresses that taking pictures of the sun is fraught with technical difficulties, and depends on a large slice of luck, explaining, “Unlike many astronomical things, the sun always changes and never knows what to expect from day to day.”

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here