Scientists use a tool made of cake molds to identify mysterious signals in the universe … photos

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Astronomers used a strange tool made of a metal tube and two cake molds to locate the source of a mysterious rapid radio explosion in the Milky Way, as astronomers from the California Institute of Technology and MCGill University identified a magnetic star 32,000 light-years from Earth as the source of the explosion of intense energy, according to a newspaper. British “Daily Mail”, scientists recognized these fast radio pulses about 13 years ago and saw them coming from outside our galaxy, but this is the first that was found in our region.

The innovative antenna
The innovative antenna

This radio stream was first detected in April as a rare blast and much weaker than usual, by two very different telescopes, a $ 20 million Canadian Observatory and a student’s hand-held antenna cobbled together from cake boxes and a metal tube.
Also, since fast radio explosions last only a fraction of a second, and were previously only found in distant galaxies, and are often one-off explosions, it may be difficult to trace their sources, so scientists took time to track this local explosion of a magnetic star that has been suspected since For a long time it is the source of some distant eruptions.

Radio streaming device
Radio streaming device

Perhaps magnetic stars are incredibly dense neutron stars, with a mass 1.5 times the mass of our Sun crammed into a space the size of Manhattan.

Astronomer Casey Law of the California Institute of Technology, who was not part of the research, said the magnetic field around these magnetic stars is so strong that it tears apart any nearby atoms and strange aspects of basic physics can be seen.

Although this occurs frequently outside of the Milky Way, astronomers have no idea how often these bursts occur within our galaxy.

Radio wave antenna
Radio wave antenna

“We still don’t know how lucky we were,” said Christopher Bochenick, a California Institute of Technology student who built the DIY STARE2 antenna system for about $ 15,000.

The astronomer explained, “It might be an event that happens every five years or there may be a few events that happen every year.”

They are primitive instruments designed to look at a giant piece of sky, about a quarter of it, and see only the brightest radio flashes, the doctoral student said.

Bouchink added, that this explosion occurs in less than a second and contains the same amount of energy produced by our sun in one month, and this is still much weaker than the radio explosions detected coming from outside our galaxy.

Although this occurs frequently outside of the Milky Way, astronomers have no idea how often these bursts occur within our galaxy.

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