Study demonstrates the ability to detect fake news online

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Many people think they can easily spot fake news online, but a new report suggests we may not be as lucky in identifying misinformation as we think, according to a report. RT .

Internet regulator was conducted Ofcom A survey of more than 13,000 people in the UK who use the internet, about the scope of their online habits, device use and attitudes towards social media.

Although seven in 10 adults (69%) said they were confident in identifying misinformation, one in five (22%) were able to correctly identify the signs of a real post, without making mistakes.

This pattern was most impressive among older children aged 12-17, with 74% saying they were confident in themselves, but only 11% were able to understand fact from fiction.

Overall, the study found that 30% of UK adults who go online (14.5 million) are unsure or even not thinking about the reliability of the information they see online, and another 6%, or about one in 20 internet users, believe in everything. They see it online.

and warned Ofcom That the “huge volume” of information available online means having basic skills and being able to spot information that might be wrong or biased “has never been more important”. Every minute, 500 hours of content are uploaded to YouTube, 5,000 videos are watched on TikTok and 695,000 stories are shared on Instagram.

and found Ofcom Both adults and children overestimate their abilities to spot misinformation on various social media platforms.

Melanie Dawes, CEO of Ofcom: “In a volatile and unpredictable world, it is imperative that everyone has the tools and confidence to separate fact from fiction online – whether it is about money, health, world events or other people.”

But many adults and children struggle to spot what might be fake. So we’re calling on tech companies to prioritize rooting out harmful misinformation, before we take on our new role in helping address the problem.

and provided Ofcom Tips on what to consider when deciding fact from fiction online, including, crucially, checking the source and thinking about your own motivations for wanting to believe it.

Melanie Dawes, CEO of Ofcom: “In a volatile and unpredictable world, it is imperative that everyone has the tools and confidence to separate fact from fiction online – whether it is about money, health, world events or other people.”

But many adults and children struggle to spot what might be fake. So we’re calling on tech companies to prioritize rooting out harmful misinformation, before we take on our new role in helping address the problem.

and provided Ofcom Tips on what to consider when deciding fact from fiction online, including, crucially, checking the source and thinking about your own motivations for wanting to believe it.

As for research, I conducted Ofcom Three surveys of people aged 16 and over, each focusing on different aspects of online use.

One sample consisted of 3,660, 6,566 and 3,095 people – a total of 13,321 different people.

For each survey response, percentages were calculated based on one of the three survey totals, rather than a cumulative total of 13,321.

In one survey, participants were shown social media posts and profiles to determine if they could verify their authenticity.

Although 69% of adults and 74% of children aged 12-17 years said they were confident in identifying misinformation, only 22% and 11%, respectively, were able to correctly identify real post tags, without making mistakes.

Similarly, 24% of adults and 27% of children who claimed to be confident that misinformation had been detected were unable to identify a fake social media profile.

The study also found that 33% of parents of children aged 5-7, and 60% of parents of children aged 8-11, reported that their children had a social media profile, despite being below the minimum age requirement. 13 for most sites.

Tik Tok, in particular, is growing in popularity even among younger age groups.

Surprisingly, 16% of three- to four-year-olds and 29% of five- to seven-year-olds use the platform, even though the app is meant to be for people aged 13 and over.

and warned Ofcom Many children can use other fake accounts – to hide aspects of their online lives from parents.

The study found that 64% of children between the ages of eight and 11 have multiple accounts or profiles. Of those, 46% only have an account for their families to see.

More than a third of children (35%) reported engaging in risky behaviors, which could impede proper screening of their online use by a parent or guardian.

Interestingly, children feel positive about the benefits of being online, and many of them use social media as a force for good.

Fifty-three percent of people aged 13-17 said they feel that being online is good for their mental health, compared to 17 percent of the same age group who did not.



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